Facemask Updates

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UPDATE AS OF: May 14, 2020, 4 p.m. PST

We wanted to give you another update on your Vancouver Aquarium x Whitecaps FC face mask order.
Production of our face masks is well underway. By the end of this week, almost 20,000 masks will have shipped! To date, more than 113,000 masks have been sold with proceeds going to #SaveVancouverAquarium. All production is happening locally and we are re-opening factories and bringing people back to work!

Get a behind-the-scenes glimpse at your mask in production by watching our new video.

For the latest info on mask production and timeframes, keep an eye on this page. Once your mask order has shipped, you’ll receive an email from us with your tracking number.

Once again, THANK YOU for your support of this fundraising initiative and for your patience in waiting for your mask to arrive. The Vancouver Aquarium has been overwhelmed by the public’s support in response to our call for help. But we’re not there yet. There is still much work to be done to secure the Vancouver Aquarium’s future.

We are so grateful for your patience and understanding. Both the Whitecaps FC and the Vancouver Aquarium are fully dedicated to making sure you get your mask(s) as quickly as possible.

It truly does take a village to save the Aquarium.


Lasse Gustavsson
President & CEO - Ocean Wise

Mark Pannes
CEO - Whitecaps FC

 

Thank you from rescued sea turtle Berni Stranders

Berni Stranders In September 2019, a rare, tropical sea turtle was discovered hypothermic and close to death in the waters off Port Alberni, BC. Rescued by our Marine Mammal Rescue team, Berni Stranders - as he was affectionately named by his care team - was brought to the Vancouver Aquarium to receive treatment which included antibiotics, fluids, and slowly raising his body temperature from 11 degrees Celsius to his ideal body temperature of over 20 degrees Celsius. Berni is now healthy and awaiting permits from Canadian and U.S. authorities to allow him to travel south of the border (likely to California) where he will be released back into the wild! (This process is obviously being slowed because of the COVID-19 pandemic). Berni is only the fourth olive ridley sea turtle recorded on the B.C. coast. The last one was in 2016 when Marine Mammal Rescue Centre staff rescued, rehabilitated and released “Comber” the sea turtle. Populations of olive ridley sea turtles in the wild are sadly decreasing. Learn more about our animal rescue efforts at rescue.ocean.org


UPDATE AS OF: May 12, 2020, 2 p.m. PST

Good news! Masks have begun shipping! Some people may have already received an email update from the Vancouver Aquarium Gift Shop informing them their order has been shipped. Canadian shipping is being handled by Canada Post and shipping times vary. Orders being sent outside of Canada are being shipped using Fedex and UPS. Our Lower Mainland manufacturing partners continue to make masks as quickly as possible and teams at the Whitecaps FC and Vancouver Aquarium continue to work on getting everyone their mask as quickly as possible. We won’t stop working until everyone has their mask! Thank you for your continued patience and for helping to #SaveVancouverAquarium. 


UPDATE AS OF: May 8, 2020, 1 p.m. PST

Hello Friend!

You might have heard that demand for our Vancouver Aquarium x Whitecaps FC facemasks has been tremendous. To date, we have sold more than 100,000 masks, with all proceeds going to #SaveVancouverAquarium.

Firstly, THANK YOU!

Thank you for supporting the Vancouver Aquarium through this initiative. Every dollar helps the not-for-profit Vancouver Aquarium survive the COVID-19 closure by supporting the care of our animals. It also helps to ensure that Ocean Wise’s important ocean conservation, animal rescue, ocean education and ocean research work can continue for generations to come.

But where is my mask?

Teams at both the Vancouver Aquarium and Whitecaps FC are working to get you your mask(s) as quickly as possible! Delays owing to COVID-19 distancing restrictions in our production facilities, as well as overwhelming demand for our masks, have put us behind where we wanted to be on production. Because production has to happen in stages (cutting all the masks first, then fabric printing, then sewing all the masks) the huge demand also has meant we’ve had to spend more time than anticipated getting production facilities online and getting these preliminary stages completed. At this point, we aren’t able to give you an exact date when your mask(s) will arrive, but we hope to have more concrete information for you soon.

Here’s the good news

  • 5,000 masks are shipping this weekend!
  • 51,000 masks have now been cut.
  • The fabric printing (sublimation) is in production.
  • We have reopened factories that were shuttered due to COVID-19 and our manufacturing partner has contracted new small businesses to help.
  • All manufacturing of the masks is happening in the Lower Mainland meaning we are supporting local jobs!
  • We promise to send you regular updates. And as soon as your order is ready, we’ll ship it out to you, and email you the tracking information.

We are so grateful for your patience and understanding. Both the Whitecaps FC and the Vancouver Aquarium are fully dedicated to making sure you get your mask(s) as quickly as possible.

It truly does take a village to save the Aquarium.

Lasse Gustavsson 
Ocean Wise President & CEO 

Mark Pannes
Vancouver Whitecaps FC CEO

 

Thank you from Rialto the rescued otter

rialto2.jpgRialto was discovered abandoned as a newborn pup in 2016, washed up and alone on a remote beach. He was emaciated, had pneumonia and a gastrointestinal infection. Sick, and stranded without his mother, the tiny otter had no chance of survival. After more than six weeks of 24-hour care by Vancouver Aquarium Marine Mammal Rescue Centre staff, Rialto came to live at the Vancouver Aquarium where he is now a cherished ambassador for his species, raising critical awareness about the challenges sea otters face in the wild including pollution, oil spills, predation, disease, and human interference. Sea otters populations in the wild have recovered in recent decades after nearly being hunted to extinction in the early 1900s.